Bridge Blanks There are 7 products.

A bridge is a device for supporting the strings on a stringed instrument. It transmits the vibration of those strings to the? soundboard?in order to transfer the sound to the surrounding air. ?Bridges are most commonly a single piece of wood that fits between the strings and the surface of the soundboard. ?We?carry several?bridge blanks that cou...

A bridge is a device for supporting the strings on a stringed instrument. It transmits the vibration of those strings to the? soundboard?in order to transfer the sound to the surrounding air. ?Bridges are most commonly a single piece of wood that fits between the strings and the surface of the soundboard. ?We?carry several?bridge blanks that could be used for guitars, mandolins and violins.

SIZEDIMENSIONS
IN MM**
DIMENSIONS
IN INCH**
Classic 180 x 40-45 x 10-12 mm 7?x?1.6-1.8 x .39-.47 "
Western 200?x?50 x?10-12 mm 7.9?x?1.96 x?.39-.47 "

** Dimensions can vary from?bridge to bridge.?Please contact sales@gjtonewood.com for exact sizes of YOUR bridges.

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Subcategories

  • East Indian Rosewood

    (Dalbergia latifolia)

  • Indian Ebony

    (Diospyros ebenum)

  • Indian Laurel

    (Terminalia elliptica)

  • Katalox

    (Swartzia spp. (S. cubensis))


    Katalox is an exotic wood that is native to Central America. It is far superior in strength to either Teak or Hard maple. Strength qualities in compression parallel to grain are exceptionally high. It is very hard - much harder than White oak, Hard maple, or Teak. The wood is exceptionally heavy. It weighs much more than Hard maple or Teak in the green or seasoned condition. The wood is very dense.

  • Granadillo

    (Platymiscium spp.)

    Granadillo is a relatively new wood to American guitar making but is fairly common in South America. It is non-porous, straight grained to interlocked, very dense,? with a medium to fine texture, and has a ringing, bright tap tone. It works easily but can dull tools a bit, has a medium to fine texture, and finishes well with a high natural luster. The reddish brown color will darken to
    a brick color over time much like Honduran Rosewood.

    *Each Sold?Separately?

    *Photos are?typical of what you could expect when purchasing.

    *Sizes may vary slightly.

  • Ziricote
    (Cordia dodecandra)

    Ziricote is an exotic wood native to the Central American countries of Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico.?

    The feel is buttery smooth and slick. This dark gray to brown to black wood is similar to Ebony in weight and density.?It is a hard, dense wood, with a medium texture.?The density translates to great sustain with a nice, medium tone.?The color ranges from reddish brown to dark brown,?sometimes with either a green or purple hue, with unusual black streaks.?Some pieces have gorgeous striping and "spider web" grain patterns?or ?landscape? grain figure. Quartersawn surfaces can also have ray flakes similar in appearance to those found on quartersawn?Hard Maple. The pale yellowish sapwood is sometimes incorporated into designs for aesthetic effect, or to cut down on wastage.?It works very nicely and finishes well to a high luster.
  • Padouk

    Padauk (Pterocarpus soyauxii)

    Padouk is an open and straight grained with a coarse texture. It is easy to work with and glues and finishes well. Padouk offers an extremely beautiful, exotic look to your next custom build. While tonally, and visually similar to Indian Rosewood, it has a striking reddish/orange color when freshly cut creating a stunning visual effect. Its unique coloring will darken with exposure to light.

  • Gaboon Ebony

    (Diospyros crassiflora)

    Gaboon Ebony is an exotic wood native to Western Africa. It is an extremely hard, dense, and heavy wood, with a very fine texture. The heartwood is a uniform jet-black or black-brown streaked. Gaboon Ebony is somewhat difficult to work with hand and machine tools, but is excellent for inlays, tool and knife handles, piano and organ keys, and instrument wood. It takes an excellent polish.

  • Black Walnut

    (Juglans nigra)

    Walnut is the only North American dark wood.?Its heartwood varies from a purplish-brown with thin, dark veins to gray-brown and even orange-brown or?lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. It can sometimes have a grey, purple, or reddish cast The narrow sapwood tends to be white.?Grain is usually straight, but can be irregular. Has a medium texture and moderate natural luster.??Sapwood is pale yellow-gray to nearly white. Figured grain patterns such as curl, crotch, and burl are also seen.?Under a gloss, the grain is very deep, thick and rich looking.


    Glues, stains, and finishes well, (though walnut is rarely stained).?It is somewhat softer than Maple though stiffer than Mahogany.

Showing 1 - 7 of 7 items
Showing 1 - 7 of 7 items

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